Monday, 25 July 2016

Sendak, Maurice "Where The Wild Things Are"


Sendak, Maurice "Where The Wild Things Are" - 1963


I think everyone born after the year 1960 must have had this book read to them when they were little. At least those in the English speaking world. Even though it has been translated into several languages in the meantime, I don't think it was around when I was little.

Anyway, the story reminds me a lot of the fairy tales we used to listen to and read when we were little. I loved them all but never became a fantasy fan. But this story is different, it IS a fairy tale, even though it wasn't written at the times of the Brothers Grimm.

Definitely a classic that is still worth picking up.

According to Wikipedia, "in a 2012 survey of School Library Journal readers, it was voted the number one picture book - and not for the first time."

From the back cover: "One night Max puts on his wolf suit and makes mischief of one kind and another, so his mother calls him 'Wild Thing' and sends him to bed without his supper. That night a forest begins to grow in Max's room and an ocean rushes by with a boat to take Max to the place where the wild things are. Max tames the wild things and crowns himself as their king, and then the wild rumpus begins. But when Max has sent the monsters to bed, and everything is quiet, he starts to feel lonely and realises it is time to sail home to the place where someone loves him best of all."

6 comments:

  1. I love this book, when I was a teacher I always read this to my class. I even own a Mac doll, still!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is sweet. I can imagine how well kids react to it if you read it with the right intonations and faces and everything. Must have been fun.

      Delete
  2. My kids were born in the 70s. They did like to have this one read to them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My kids were born a little later, 80s/90s, but they also loved them. Looks like good stories never grow old.

      Delete
  3. I think if you asked my son what books were his favorite as a little boy, he'd mention this one... and another Maurice Sendak, Into the Night Kitchen. And yes, we always read them with the proper intonations and actions. Ah, what a memory.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not surprised. I suppose most little boys whose parents read this book to them would say the same, it is a wonderful story. Never came across "Into the Night Kitchen". Will have to explore. Too late for my kids but one can always hope for grandchildren. LOL.

      Thanks for your comment,
      Marianne

      Delete