Tuesday, 22 November 2022

Nonfiction November 2022 Week 4 Worldview Changers #NonficNov

Week 4 (November 21-25): Worldview Changers
with Rebekah at She Seeks Nonfiction

Week 4 of Non-Fiction November (see here) is quite a challenge.

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Week 4 (November 21-25) - Worldview Changers: One of the greatest things about reading nonfiction is learning all kinds of things about our world which you never would have known without it. There’s the intriguing, the beautiful, the appalling, and the profound. What nonfiction book or books has impacted the way you see the world in a powerful way? Do you think there is one book that everyone needs to read for a better understanding of the world we live in? (Rebekah @ She Seeks Nonfiction)

So, this would be my suggestion.
Marx, Karl; Engels, Friedrich "The Communist Manifesto" (
GE: Das kommunistische Manifest) - 1848

I don't think some people want their worldview changed. There are many books that can change your view, your understanding about how things work. But if people would read The Communist Manifesto without thinking Soviet Union, oppression, etc. but with an open mind as to what we can do for each other, maybe Karl Marx' wish would come true:
"Then the world will be for the common people, and the sounds of happiness will reach the deepest springs. Ah! Come! People of every land, how can you not be roused."

Maybe think Scandinavian, they are the closest to the beliefs of Marx and Engels and they are the happiest people in the world.

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For more information on Nonfiction November check here.

9 comments:

  1. I keep meaning to read the Manifesto. Maybe next year as part of my aim to read 10 classics?

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    1. I've read it three times and definitely would not call it a classic. A world-changer, yes....like Mein Kampf in that regard. ;-) (The first time I read it was to read world-changing books, the following times were for classes in modern European history and sociological theory.)


      In response to the original question, I suppose if I could make everyone read one book...it would be....Neil Postman's "Amusing Ourselves to Death", which has only become more relevant with every passing year. That, or Alain de Botton's "Consolations of Philosophy"., which taps into Seneca, de Montaigne, etc to see what we can learn from them....and from the inquiring life in general.

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    2. Who knows, Kitten. I definitely recommend it, otherwise it wouldn't have appeared here.

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    3. @Stephen. It depends what you call a classic. For me, it's a book that has a certain age, in my case I usually tend to go for more than a hundred but that might be due to my age, others call books a classic when it's only fifty years old. In that respect it definitely is a classic. And - it still is read and widely spoken of. So, I don't know why you wouldn't call it a classic but that's up to you.
      I think I read something by Alain de Botton but I can't remember what it was. I only remember that it didn't make a huge impression, otherwise I certainly would know more about it. But, I might go and have a look for this one. Thanks.

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  2. There are certainly tenets of communism I agree with, though I only have a cursory knowledge. Thanks for sharing your recommendations.

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    1. Gulag Archipelago is a great book to learn more about what people can do for one another under communism.

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    2. Thank you, Shelley Rae. There is a lot any person would agree with, not what they did with it but the original idea.
      @Anon. I totally agree though that is not about communism but Stalinism and what the Russians did with.

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  3. I have not read it, but can imagine it is a life changer. I think it might be somewhat misunderstood since it is, for many people, connected to communism. It would certainly be interesting to read.

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    1. It wasn't as much a huge mind changer for me, Lisbeth, since I have read other books about it and always liked the idea of the original and true communism, not what the politicians in certain countries did with it. But I would like to see what people who only have negative connotations with what they think after they read about the original idea.

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