Monday, 6 June 2011

Austen, Jane "Sense & Sensibility"


Austen, Jane "Sense & Sensibility" - 1811

This novel describes the life of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, two sisters who are completely different. Elinor, the elder, is the "sense", Marianne the "sensibility. After the death of their father, they have to cope with poverty and with their way of finding love.

I loved this novel, as I love all of Jane Austen's books. What it makes so remarkable and still interesting today is the description of the different sisters and how they cope with the problems society puts them through.

People still are more an Elinor or a Marianne, sometimes you have to be one or the other, sometimes you can be both.

From the back cover:
"Compelled to leave Norland in Sussex for Barton Cottage in Devonshire, the two sisters are soon accepted into their new society. Marianne, whose sweet radiance and open nature charm the roguish John Willoughby, is soon deeply in love. Elinor, whose disposition is more cautious and considered, who carefully conceals her emotions, is suffering the loss of Edward Ferrars whom she has left behind.
Despite their very different personalities, both sisters experience great sorrows in their affairs of the heart: Marianne demonstrably wretched and Elinor allowing no one to see her private heartache. It is, however, the qualities common to them both - discernment, constancy and integrity in the face of the fecklessness of others - that allow them entry into a new life of peace and contentment.
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I have reviewed "Sense & Sensibility" a second time  as a member of The Motherhood and Jane Austen Book Club. Find that review here and a list of all my "motherhood" reviews here.

I read a lot of novels by or about Jane Austen. Find a link to all my reviews here.

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