Tuesday, 12 April 2022

Top Ten Tuesday ~ Authors I Haven’t Read, But Want To

          

"Top Ten Tuesday" is an original feature/weekly meme created on the blog "The Broke and the Bookish". This feature was created because they are particularly fond of lists at "The Broke and the Bookish". It is now hosted by Jana from That Artsy Reader Girl.

Since I am just as fond of them as they are, I jump at the chance to share my lists with them! Have a look at their page, there are lots of other bloggers who share their lists here.

This week, our topic is Authors I Haven’t Read, But Want To.

First I thought, ups, I think I've read most authors that I really want to read. But then I got it. There is a huge list of authors that I still want to read: the Nobel Prize winners that I haven't read, yet.

So, it was only a matter of looking for the authors that I really would like to read and since there are definitely more than ten, I just started to go backwards. And here they are:

🇹🇿🇬🇧 🇦🇹 🇯🇵 🇪🇸 🇳🇬 🇧🇬🇬🇧 🇨🇦🇺🇸 🇸🇪 🇸🇪 🇬🇧🇦🇺

Abdulrazak Gurnah, 2021 🇹🇿 🇬🇧
Abdulrazak Gurnah was born in Tanzania and has British citizenship. He writes in English received the prize "for his uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the fate of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents". (Wikipedia)

Peter Handke, 2019
🇦🇹
Peter Handke is from Austria. He writes in German and received the prize "for an influential work that with linguistic ingenuity has explored the periphery and the specificity of human experience".
(Wikipedia)

Kenzaburo Oe, 1994 🇯🇵
Kenzaburo Oe is from Japan. He writes in Japanese and
received the prize "who with poetic force creates an imagined world, where life and myth condense to form a disconcerting picture of the human predicament today". (Wikipedia)

Camilo José Cela, 1989
🇪🇸
Camilo José Cela was from Spain. He wrote in Spanish and
received the prize "for a rich and intensive prose, which with restrained compassion forms a challenging vision of man's vulnerability". (Wikipedia)

Wole Soyinka, 1986
🇳🇬
Wole Soyinka
is Nigerian. He writes in English and received the prize because he "fashions the drama of existence ... in a wide cultural perspective and with poetic overtones". (Wikipedia)

Elias Canetti, 1981
🇧🇬 🇬🇧
Elias Canetti was born in Bulgaria and had British citizenship. He wrote in German and received the prize "for writings marked by a broad outlook, a wealth of ideas and artistic power". (Wikipedia)

Saul Bellow, 1976
🇨🇦 🇺🇸
Saul Bellow was born in Canada and had the US American citizenship. He wrote in English and
received the prize "for the human understanding and subtle analysis of contemporary culture that are combined in his work". (Wikipedia)

Harry Martinson, 1974
🇸🇪
Harry Martinson was from Sweden. He wrote in Swedish and received the prize "for writings that catch the dewdrop and reflect the cosmos". (Wikipedia)

Eyvind Johnson, 1974
🇸🇪
Eyvind Johnson was also from Sweden and wrote in Swedish.
He received the prize "for a narrative art, farseeing in lands and ages, in the service of freedom".
(Wikipedia)

Patrick White, 1973
🇬🇧 🇦🇺
Patrick White was born in the United Kingdom and had Australian citizenship. He wrote in English and received the prize "for an epic and psychological narrative art, which has introduced a new continent into literature". (Wikipedia)

If you wonder why there are so many large gaps in between some authors, well, first of all, I am not a huge fan of poetry, so I usually leave those out unless I finish all the authors that wrote novels or non-fiction one day or if one of them comes up in my book club or elsewhere.

So, there are two authors who write in Spanish, two in German, one in Japanese, one in Spanish and the last for all write in English.

I contribute to this page: Read the Nobels and you can find all my blogs about Nobel Prize winning authors and their books here.

📚 Happy Reading! 📚

22 comments:

  1. That's an intimidating list, Marianne!

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    1. I didn't want to intimidate anyone, Carol. I have just found so many great authors among the Nobel Prize winners that I would love to read them all, well, except for the poets, not a big fan of poetry.

      Some of the Nobel Prize winners I have read belong to my absolute favourite authors.

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  2. I’ve never read any of these authors, but they sure do sound good!

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    1. Thanks, Lydia. I think most Nobel Prize winners' books sound good and if that is the kind of literature you like, they are all worth reading. But - we can't possibly read all of them so we have to pick the ones we like. Maybe you find a few on my Nobel Prize list.

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  3. I recognise a few of the authors in your Word Cloud but not the ones in the list you've made! I hope you enjoy their works whenever you get around to reading them 😊

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    1. Thanks, Dini. I have read books by the authors in the word clouds and most of them are pretty famous but those that I haven't read, obviously didn't make it outside their country/language area. I hope I will get to read some soon.

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  4. I do not recognize any of these authors. I think it's great that you want to read Nobel Prize winners :)

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    1. Thanks, Cindy. As you might have seen, I have a whole list of Nobel Prize winners and their books that I already read. I hope I can add to that list. And no shame for not knowing any of the authors. Except for Peter Handke who writes in German and Saul Bellow who is pretty well-known on the British Isles, I wouldn't know any of the names if they hadn't received the prize.

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  5. An interesting list. I don't know these authors! I need to brush up on my literature knowledge!

    Happy TTT

    Emily @ Budget Tales Book Blog
    https://budgettalesblog.wordpress.com/2022/04/12/top-10-tuesday-24/

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    1. Haha, Emily. I think we only need to brush up as much as we want to. We all have books where others say, I would NEVER read those. And I know my list is pretty "special" (not a rating, just different from many others). We all find new books on other blogs that we might want to read at some point and if we don't, well, next week is another TTT.

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  6. I hope you love all of these authors when you get to them.

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    1. Thanks, Deanna. I probably will love at least some of them.

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  7. Other than Saul Bellow, I've never heard of any of these. I hope you enjoy them!

    Happy TTT!

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    1. As I mentioned above, except for Peter Handke who writes in German and Saul Bellow, I wouldn't know any of the names if they hadn't received the prize. So, I'm not surprised most people don't know them, either.

      Thanks, Susan. Looking forward to your list.

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  8. Sadly, the only one of these authors I know much about is Saul Bellow, even though I haven't read any of his books. I would really like to read some books by Wole Soyinka and Kenzaburo Oe! Great TTT list. :)

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    1. Thanks, Lark. Just mentioned it a couple of times and I think Saul Bellow is the one more likely to be known in the English speaking world. But some Nobel Prize winners deserve to get known outside of their bubble.

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  9. There are so many award-winning books that I want to read. I have a whole Pinterest board full of them. I hope you love these authors!

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    1. Thanks, Aj, I've been quite active on Pinterest for a while but that never really included many books. I have, however, a huge wishlist and Nobel Prize winners always seem to be very deserving. I'll have to look at your list.

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  10. This would definitely be a tough one for me, good thing I did not have time again this week. I could have done a list of authors I will NEVER read though, that would have been fun!

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    1. Hahaha, good idea, Sarah, we should keep that in mind for one of those weeks where we have absolutely no idea. I have a few on that list where I read one book but would never read a second one, so that's the next thought. LOL

      Always nice to hear your point of view, even if you don't make your own lists. You have plenty of others during the week and I always enjoy your posts.

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  11. Great list! I love Ōe, but he is often "dark", disturbing and existential and I am sure not for everyone. I reviewed two of his books, if you are interested. I haven't had much luck with liking Handke, but I only read "Slow Homecoming" and found it only adequate. I could not get into White's Riders in the Chariot either, though I thought it would be my favourite book, from all the descriptions. Maybe I will try again (that's just shows literary "genius" minds, I am sure).

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    1. Thanks, Diana, I don't mind "dark", I prefer it to "too easy". I will have a look at your reviews, thanks. I have just ordered a book by him, "A personal matter" which sounds very interesting.

      And I have "Storm Still" by Peter Handke on my TBR pile. He is not the most beloved author in the German speaking world and him receiving the Nobel Prize was greated with very controversial reactions. So I will see whether I like him. And yes, great literary "genius" there, Diana.

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