Saturday, 2 October 2021

Six Degrees of Separation ~ The Lottery

 The Lottery
Jackson, Shirley "The Lottery" - 1948

#6Degrees of Separation:
from The Lottery to The Wave 

#6Degrees is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. I love the idea. See more about this challenge, its history, further books and how I found this here.
 
This month's prompt starts with The Lottery by Shirley Jackson.

Kate mentioned that there was no excuse for not reading the starting book since this is the first time we’ve started with a short story. Weeeeeelll, I don’t really like short stories. The longer a book, the better. However, since I could read the story online and it really was only 30 pages, I did it anyway as you can see in my link here.

The story about a small American town who holds a lottery to find a scapegoat reminded me very much of a newer successful book that selects members from their community for a gruesome task.

Collins, Suzanne "The Hunger Games" - 2008

That title led me to a book with a completely other kind of game, more in a magic realism world than a dystopian one but still quite surreal.

Ruiz Zafón, Carlos "The Angel's Game" - 2008

In this story, one of my favourite authors talks about a library of forgotten books. Another novel in a similar setting is a children's or youth book where people from the book come to life.

Funke, Cornelia "Inkheart" (German: Tintenherz) - 2003

And then there is the book where nobody comes out of the book but somebody goes in:

Ende, Michael "The Neverending Story" (German: Die unendliche Geschichte) - 1979

Here we read about disappearing people because everyone has stopped reading fairy tales. So, another fairy tale should be the next link, right? Maybe in a different setting. Fractured fairy tales.

Scieszka, Jon; Smith, Lane "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" - 1989

Talking about true stories in the title, here is a real one. When his students couldn't believe how people could follow the nazis and not do anything against them, their teacher started an experiment.

Rhue, Morton "The Wave" - 1981

You might think there isn't a huge connection between the first and the last book. Or is there? If you've read both of them (and none of them is very long), you will understand.

12 comments:

  1. Yes, I think Hunger Games is a very good first link. But oh... that Wave... scary stuff, and yes, there is a connection, if you think about it.

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    1. Thanks, Davida. You are right "The Wave" is scary but it's a story that needs to be told so history doesn't repeat itself. So many young people are fascinated by right wing paroles nowadays, that's even scarier.

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  2. I love how you make the connections go through books that venture into and out of books, fairy tales and then back into a true story that illumines the unbelievable. Great sequence.

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    1. It's always an interesting trip through literature, Lory. I have done months where I just went by the titles but this one just offered that way. I hope I will be able to do that again in the next months but it always depends what the first book tells me, how it "speaks" to me.

      In any case, it's always a good way to reminisce. Thanks for your visit.

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  3. I love these posts and seeing where they lead. Beautiful covers :)

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    1. Thanks, Greg. Somehow, they have a mind of their own, they present a new story. Always fastincating.

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  4. This really is a thought-provoking chain. The Three Little Pigs is certainly one I shall follow up, as well as The Wave. Thanks!

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    1. Oh, Margaret, thank you very much. I came across The Three Little Pigs when my boys were little and we sold them in our book fair at school. Lovely way of telling people that there are always two sides to a story.

      And The Wave, I read that in school, at least I thought I did. In any case, I think everyone should read it because it shows how people get pushed into a certain situation.

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  5. Very nice connections. Now I'm intrigued with the last title

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    1. It's definitely worth reading, Emma. Even a true story. And, as I said on there, it is probably even worth more today than when it was written.

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  6. I considered adding Hunger Games, too, for the lottery aspect of it. My 6-Degrees post

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    1. Thank you, Anne. The whole story reminded me about it, so I just had to start with that one. And it led so well to my other books, this was one of the easiest six degrees chains I've done.

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